Expired Green Card Consequences

Legal permanent residents are typically required to renew their green card every ten years. The card expires if not renewed. When that happens there are some consequences you should be aware of.

A green card shows proof that you are a permanent resident. One important fact to know is although your green card may be expiring your status as a permanent resident does not change. What you lose is the ability to prove you are a legal permanent resident.

Not being able to prove your status may cause some issues for you. Let’s go over the top three.

Getting a New Job

Your employer is required by law to verify if you are eligible to work legally in the United States. As a green card holder, that’s not typically an issue unless your card is expired. The verification process includes USCIS Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification. This form requires that your employer take a look at your proof of immigration status.

Not having a valid green card could lead to issues with your new employer.

Renewing Your Driver’s License

Most states require you provide proof of your immigration status in order to renew your driver’s license. It may take four to six months or longer to receive your new green card so it’s important to be aware of when your driver’s license and green card expire.

If you are interested in which states require proof of residency, click here.

Traveling Outside the United States

If your green card is expired, traveling outside the United States may be a problem. Green card holders are required to prove their immigration status when reentering the country.

If you know your green card will expire while you’re out of the country, you may request an I-551 stamp that is valid for a year. This should allow you to reenter the country without an issue.

Traveling on an expired green card may be risky because several issues may come up. You may not be allowed back into the United States. Some airlines may not even let you board the plane.

The safest thing to do is to renew your green card as soon as possible.